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Both are necessary for a robust, cost-effective system. CUs are monitored including monitoring escapement and catch, stock identification, sex, age, spawning success, and the fecundity of spawners and reassessed as appropriate. In order to be effective, habitat and ecosystem assessment and sustainable management require an integrated approach; thus Strategy 2 and Strategy 3 are considered together. Freshwater and marine habitats are vital to different life stages of salmon.

During spawning, feeding, rearing and migration, salmon spend time in rivers, lakes, and near-shore coastal areas. In contrast, during adult stages, salmon spend time in the open ocean before returning to freshwater to spawn. Different salmon populations spend varying amounts of time in each of these habitats.

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Natural and human-induced changes to these habitats e. These changes affect salmon health, although due to the variations in time spent in each habitat, salmon populations will be impacted differently.

Throughout their life histories, there may also be cumulative impacts across the range of habitats that will affect salmon population health. For a conceptual overview of ecosystem drivers that impact salmon populations see Natural and Human-induced Pressures on Salmon Habitat on page To assess freshwater habitats streams, lakes and estuaries , DFO has identified a preliminary suite of indicators, and related benchmarks and metrics Stahlberg et al.

These include physical and chemical indicators designed to measure the quantity of habitat e. These indicators have been tested at different levels of assessment, from overview analyses of the habitat pressures in CU watersheds, to more detailed reports examining highly productive or limiting habitats, and threats to them.

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Recent research suggests different salmon populations behave similarly when faced with the same broad scale habitat pressures. As a result, assessment of data rich salmon habitats and ecosystems, particularly freshwater environments, can be applied to groups of salmon CUs in the same habitat area e. This methodology has been adapted from a framework on Ecological Risk Assessment for the Effects of Fishing initially developed to inform an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management in Australia Hobday et al. Pilot testing of RAMS in several workshops has allowed DFO to provide an evidence-based diagnosis of factors driving state changes for populations or CUs of interest, as well as to identify management intervention actions that may be effective in avoiding, stabilizing or less commonly , reversing a decline.

The RAMS methodology can be applied at whatever scale CU, group of CUs, streams, watershed, river basins, or eco-regions wild salmon populations warrant by their underlying genetic and eco-typic structure. Risk assessment toolkit: There are two key separate tools in the risk assessment toolkit. Each has merit as a risk assessment procedure.

Research is also ongoing to better understand marine and freshwater ecosystems, including the impacts of climate change and oceanic conditions on salmon survival. Oceanographically, the Pacific coast of Canada is a transition zone between coastal upwelling California Current and downwelling Alaskan Coastal Current regions. There is strong seasonality, considerable freshwater influence, and added variability originating from conditions in the tropical south and temperate North Pacific Ocean.

The region supports ecologically and economically important resident and migratory populations of invertebrates, groundfish, pelagic fishes, marine mammals and seabirds. Monitoring of oceanographic conditions and fishery resources of the Pacific Region is undertaken by a number of government departments to better understand the natural variability of these ecosystems and how they respond to both natural and anthropogenic stresses.

Salmonid Fisheries. Freshwater Habitat Management

Ecosystem-habitat protection and restoration is not solely the responsibility of DFO, but is shared amongst other levels of government through partnerships and collaborative work. By its nature, ecosystem monitoring requires collaboration amongst a number of entities who may be collecting and monitoring data for various purposes and at various scales. This Program delivers presentations and publications in a variety of forums; pre-season, in-season, and post-season reporting on salmon returns, escapements, and survival; and an annual State of Salmon forum to foster collaboration among experts on salmon and their ecosystems.


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The Pacific State of the Salmon Program relies on an analytical tool built for scientists and managers to answer key questions that support their research, monitoring and management activities. This purposebuilt tool enables users to actively investigate and interact with data across Pacific salmon populations to identify common trends, overarching patterns, and relationships amongst populations. Key salmon datasets accessible within the tool will include abundance, productivity, body size, fecundity, and status, where available.

The tool provides a gateway and outlet for collaborating with experts, both within and outside of DFO, on salmon and their ecosystems. It will also enable broad public communication on observed patterns across salmon populations, their relationship to one another, their ecosystems, and other contributing factors. Moving forward with a focus on ecosystems will require consideration of the cumulative effects on salmon. Funded by the Pacific Salmon Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, research projects into specific cumulative effects modeling approaches for salmon were completed.

DFO will continue to work on collaborative research relevant to salmon health. Report cards draw on habitat characteristics, pressure and state indicators Stalberg et al.


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  • Habitat preservation, management and water quality in a changing climate!

Further, Southern RKWs are in decline, with the number at about 75 individual animals as of Helping to restore Chinook populations and enhance the availability of Chinook as prey are important elements of the broader response locally, regionally, nationally and in partnership with the Washington State government and groups in the US, to protect and foster the recovery of RKWs. Reductions in coast-wide salmon harvests are being implemented to conserve stocks of Southern BC Chinook and Southern RKW Management Areas are being piloted in in the Salish Sea to improve prey availability and avoid acoustic and physical disturbance in key areas.

Wild Salmon Policy to Implementation Plan | Pacific Region | Fisheries and Oceans Canada

The Pacific Salmon Foundation PSF has been partnering with federal and provincial government agencies, Indigenous communities, academic institutions, regional experts and other NGOs to compile and synthesize the best available information for salmon CUs in the Pacific Region. This innovative tool provides a comprehensive snapshot of individual salmon CUs, including information on salmon abundance, trends over time, productivity, run timing, estimates of biological status, and assessments of individual and cumulative pressures on salmon habitat.

Users can print summary reports for individual CUs, download source datasets, and access timely information on salmon populations and their freshwater habitat. The PSE will help to determine priority areas for coastal restoration projects, and provide support for the development of strategies for mitigating key threats and pressures that may be hindering the recovery of important salmon populations. To ensure projects are integrated into local and area plans, watershed planning is collaboratively undertaken with community partners.

Restoring and improving fish habitat critical to the survival of wild salmon stocks is an important focus of the Resource Restoration Unit. This work can include building side-channels, improving water flows, stabilizing stream banks, rebuilding estuary marshes, removing barriers to fish migration and planting stream-side vegetation. Watershed planning is undertaken with community partners to ensure projects are integrated into local and area plans.

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To support community, corporate and Indigenous partners in this work, the Resource Restoration Teams collaboratively undertake activities. As in previous meetings, we attempt to put together experts and colleagues interested in the "ecology of stream salmonids" based on the statements of previous meetings:.

Considering the amount of research and management efforts that stream salmonids have received, it is legitimate and timely to ask whether the knowledge acquired to date is appropriate to understand their complex ecology and overwhelming diversity of life-history strategies and to offer solutions to the conservation issues faced by all countries where stream salmonids are present. Update our knowledge on the above topics. Explore how we may move from scientific knowledge to conservation principles to ensure the long-term viability and evolutionary course of salmonids.

Evaluate mitigation of human impacts on their populations and reduce the impacts of exotic salmonids on native freshwater faunas wherever they have been introduced. Monday 20th : Registration 9 to h. Conferences h to h. Lunch to h. Conferences to h. Tuesday 21th : Conferences h to h coffe at h. Wednesday 22th : Conferences to h coffe from h.

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Evening visit to a Alhambra potential and then you are invited to a special "Spanish" dinner at h. Thursday 23th : Conferences to h coffe at h. Friday 24th : Conferences to h - coffe at h. You are invited to an evening farewell dinner at h. Saturday 25th : we are planning a one day visit to the National Park of Sierra Nevada. Specific Sessions presentations and posters are welcome within these sessions. Other Specific Sessions can be established upon request : 1. Each has merit as a risk assessment procedure. Research is also ongoing to better understand marine and freshwater ecosystems, including the impacts of climate change and oceanic conditions on salmon survival.

Oceanographically, the Pacific coast of Canada is a transition zone between coastal upwelling California Current and downwelling Alaskan Coastal Current regions. There is strong seasonality, considerable freshwater influence, and added variability originating from conditions in the tropical south and temperate North Pacific Ocean. The region supports ecologically and economically important resident and migratory populations of invertebrates, groundfish, pelagic fishes, marine mammals and seabirds. Monitoring of oceanographic conditions and fishery resources of the Pacific Region is undertaken by a number of government departments to better understand the natural variability of these ecosystems and how they respond to both natural and anthropogenic stresses.

Ecosystem-habitat protection and restoration is not solely the responsibility of DFO, but is shared amongst other levels of government through partnerships and collaborative work. By its nature, ecosystem monitoring requires collaboration amongst a number of entities who may be collecting and monitoring data for various purposes and at various scales. This Program delivers presentations and publications in a variety of forums; pre-season, in-season, and post-season reporting on salmon returns, escapements, and survival; and an annual State of Salmon forum to foster collaboration among experts on salmon and their ecosystems.

The Pacific State of the Salmon Program relies on an analytical tool built for scientists and managers to answer key questions that support their research, monitoring and management activities. This purposebuilt tool enables users to actively investigate and interact with data across Pacific salmon populations to identify common trends, overarching patterns, and relationships amongst populations.

Key salmon datasets accessible within the tool will include abundance, productivity, body size, fecundity, and status, where available. The tool provides a gateway and outlet for collaborating with experts, both within and outside of DFO, on salmon and their ecosystems. It will also enable broad public communication on observed patterns across salmon populations, their relationship to one another, their ecosystems, and other contributing factors. Moving forward with a focus on ecosystems will require consideration of the cumulative effects on salmon.

Funded by the Pacific Salmon Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, research projects into specific cumulative effects modeling approaches for salmon were completed. DFO will continue to work on collaborative research relevant to salmon health. Report cards draw on habitat characteristics, pressure and state indicators Stalberg et al.

Further, Southern RKWs are in decline, with the number at about 75 individual animals as of Helping to restore Chinook populations and enhance the availability of Chinook as prey are important elements of the broader response locally, regionally, nationally and in partnership with the Washington State government and groups in the US, to protect and foster the recovery of RKWs. Reductions in coast-wide salmon harvests are being implemented to conserve stocks of Southern BC Chinook and Southern RKW Management Areas are being piloted in in the Salish Sea to improve prey availability and avoid acoustic and physical disturbance in key areas.

The Pacific Salmon Foundation PSF has been partnering with federal and provincial government agencies, Indigenous communities, academic institutions, regional experts and other NGOs to compile and synthesize the best available information for salmon CUs in the Pacific Region. This innovative tool provides a comprehensive snapshot of individual salmon CUs, including information on salmon abundance, trends over time, productivity, run timing, estimates of biological status, and assessments of individual and cumulative pressures on salmon habitat.

Users can print summary reports for individual CUs, download source datasets, and access timely information on salmon populations and their freshwater habitat. The PSE will help to determine priority areas for coastal restoration projects, and provide support for the development of strategies for mitigating key threats and pressures that may be hindering the recovery of important salmon populations.

To ensure projects are integrated into local and area plans, watershed planning is collaboratively undertaken with community partners.